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spread to other parts of japan. it does not appear that it poses any threat to either hawaii or territories or the rest of the united states. >>> andrea mitchell just sat down with secretary of state hillary clinton in cairo. what she says about the crisis in japan, the wave of revolutions in the middle east and her surprise stop today in tahrir square. >> it's very exciting and very moving. and to see where this revolution happened and all that it has meantรง to the world is extraordinary for me. >>> also this hour, our exclusive with senator kirsten gillibrand. what she's calling on the president to do in terms of ending the war in afghanistan. >>> good day, everybody, i'm nora o'donnell live in washington. andrea's completed interview is straight ahead. >>> we begin with japan. first the human toll. six days after the quake and tsunami, the official figures stand at 4,164 dead. 7,843 missing. the total now more than 12,000. at the fukushima nuclear plant, workers are desperately trying to cool the reactors. two reactors are believed to have been damaged. two more are at r
to "washington journal" on this wednesday, march 16, 2011. the latest from japan -- "the new york times" headline -- "second reactor may have ruptured." first, let's start with the war in afghanistan. do you think it is worth fighting? a "the washington post" abc news poll says 2/3 of americans say it is not. the numbers -- we also have a line set up for active duty military. you can also e-mail us and we are on twitter. we will read your tweets on the air this morning. this is the story in "the washington post" yesterday looking at the war in afghanistan. "the afghan war is not worth fighting, most in the u.s. say." host: what do you think? is the war in afghanistan worth fighting? do you think it has been productive so far? if you think this time for a pullout? fairfax, virginia. jack joins us. good morning. caller: good morning. i had a comment about the war and one other comment. i do not think it is worth fighting. we're spending $2 billion per week and countless companies are just taking this money. it cannot be accounted for. that is why i think the republicans are all four wards because t
their involvement, allowing for no troops on the ground. the libyan story, japan story, and the budget situation at home. the continuing resolution that punts the decisions on the budget until the beginning of april. they left town this friday morning. we would like to hear which of these stories are most important to you this friday morning. let's begin with a call from san antonio, texas. robert on the independent line. caller: am i on? good morning. i wanted to say that the most significant story i believe is what is happening in the middle east with all of these uprisings and the people wanting democracy. i find it very significant, even though all of these things are happening across the world like japan, i find this very significant because even though america has not intervened with these countries to try to make than democracies, they themselves have tried to make themselves free of dictators and other powers that they did not have control of. host: robert, what do you think of this particular instance with the united nations out suggesting military force is appropriate in libya? caller:
also non-governmental organizations, look at the regulatory commissions. i think japan is quite a democratic country. it will take awhile to get all the information out of it. in this country, active citizen participation -- go to nuclear regulatory commission hearings. you can comment on all kinds of things. i recently commented on an n.r.c. regulations and rules. it is possible, but i think you have to be vigilant. host: grace writes to us on twitter asking about a ban on nuclear power plants. sharon squassoni, thank you so much for joining us this morning. she is the program director for proliferation prevention at the center for strategic & international studies. let's go now to the floor of the house of representatives, where the session is getting underway. thanks for joining us today. ker. the clerk: the speaker's room, washington, d.c., march 16, 2011. i hereby appoint the honorable renee ellmers to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of janua
candidate. he talked about the pentagon budget and japan's nuclear power crisis. this was hosted by the ideal love republican party in davenport. it's 25 minutes. >> thank you very much. congratulations on this. it happened i got to speak at the first state party event at the chairman some of you may remember in july and in 2009 with the rising stars. the great event, read energy, great fun, and i told people at home he is going to be first-rate chairman. i picked up the three, and a former county chairmen. i was the county chairmen in my county twice, once for four years and once for six years and i'm going to just tell you this is where the elections were won. they were here where the rubber meets the road. >> judy, thank you for the work that you do. [applause] >> i would be here on march 15th, but i not going to have anybody to stand behind me. >> i'm really glad to be here for the kickoff the series speaker event because we are getting ready for something very important. the 2012 election is going to be a watershed election in american history. matt didn't go into all of my
caused by the catastrophe there. it is something that japan with assistance from the world committee can achieve. it is important to recognize that we come into this challenge in the world economy in a much stronger position that we have been. you see much more confidence, i think testified here and around the world, and the resilience in the process of expansion we see under way. we want to sustain that. and they should be our focus and attention. >> i am concerned because we see toshiba and toyota stopping production. illus like we have a systemic shortage of power in japan that will cripple large publicly traded companies in being able to maintain production. >> again, there are a lot of things to be concerned about in the world. it is important that we watch this carefully. very hard to judge at this stage what will be the magnitude of the short-term cost of production output there. our focus will be on trying to help them make sure they can help meet the humanitarian challenge in the reconstruction challenge. i think it can be reasonably confident they will be able to do that. >> se
on the i live like to do offer my sincere condolences to the people of japan as they recover from one of the first national disasters in their history. japan has been a stalwart partner in afghanistan, an important contributor to the nation there. >> if i could interrupt you for a minute. thank you for doing that. >> thank you. it is the assessment that the momentum achieved by the taller than it since 2005 has been arrested and much of the country and reversed in a number of areas. it is also fragile and reversible. it is clear that much difficult work lies ahead with our partners to solidify and expand our games in the spring offensive. the achievements in 2013 -- in 2010 have allowed the joint nato -- the achievements are also very important. i've prepared to provide recommendations to president obama for commencement of the drawdown of the u.s. search forces in july. it has put us on the right path. afghan forces are in the lead by the end of 2014. bin smmit. the achievements of 2010 and early 2011 have been enabled by a determined effort to get the inputs right united states and
to take resources away from that to help the effort to analyze what happened in japan the decisions on the new reactors are still some time away. right now they're getting public comment. that will take a few months to get all of those comments in. then we will begin the process of reviewing them. that is still several months away. i am not sure exactly how we will balance our resources. mother nature has thrown a hideous tons of the japanese, bigger than their civil a nuclear engineers and licensing authority's anticipated. how can we be confident -- not that we are likely to say tsunami -- how can we be confident that we won't have a hurricane, earthquake and other natural phenomenon that is bigger than the biggest thing you have budgeted for it? guest: the way we think about it is we come up with what we think is the maximum natural phenomenon that we expect to occur and we designed these facilities around that with a little bit extra margin because we now there are some things we don't know. we recognize there may things we had not envisioned or thought about. we have establishe
that adds to the bad environment. and they love it in japan. it sells, sells, sells. think about it. we have a cat. i'm going to spray chemicals all over the couch now. oh, it smells so good. >> okay. just stop it. >> it's messed up. >> as far as we're all concerned, the number one company to work for, comcast. >> philadelphia's own. >> we have a new adjective. >> i'm been comcasted. >> absolutely. >> if you look at those companies and look at the lead her made them, risk takers. i think what we need more of in this country is risk takers. >> yes. >> we have to break out of the doldrums we're in and we need risk takers. donald trump for president. >> oh, lord. >> no doubt about it. >> you have a nice thing and went somewhere else with it. >>> we'll be right back, "morning joe." my mother froze everything. i was 18 years old before i had my first fresh bun. the invention that i came up with is the hot dog ez bun steamer. steam is the key to a great hot dog. i knew it was going to be a success. the invention was so simple that i knew i needed to protect it. my name is chris schutte and i got m
major contributors. japan for example, provides the salaries for afghan police. there is another fund to which nato-isaf countries contribute, but again it is the afghan secret forces fund that is without question. >> does that 20-24% cut which i believe is in the c.r. and h.r.-1, how does that affect its? >> when that hits, and again, we project that that would hit perhaps sometime in june, that would have an enormous affect, a negative effect on our effort, needless to say. and it would undermine, it would undercut our efforts to develop the enablers. because again, we've always had a progression that first you develop the guys that can help you in the fight, actually out there against the insurgents. and gradually build institutions, the ministries, the branch schools, leader developer courses. by the way, literacy programs have featured very probably now. we finally bit the program -- bit the bullet. with basic training we also do basic literacy now and we're way over 100,000 that have been either train or in the process. >> can you provide a timeline then? getting the independenc
additional sanctions, the european union has additional sanctions, other countries like japan, korea, etc., have added on sanctions, to get some of our partners to follow sanctions that are not u.n. sanctions has been challenging. but we are at it every single day and we will keep it up. there will be more to report to you in the near future. >> thank you for that. i just hope that you can submit for the record how many are under review and what is the 180-day tolling period look like. >> thank you. >> good morning, madame. >> good morning. >> i want to talk with you about the national debt. in is a national issue an regards to national security. how does it affect our ability to affect events around the world? >> i think it is an incredibly important issue. i clearly agree that the united states must be strong at home in order to maintain our strength abroad. at the core of our strength is our economic strength. i am well aware, having sat for you and know sitting for eight years, the necessity to take action to begin to rein in our debt and, particularly, our indebtedness to foreign cou
to the people of japan, as they work to recover from one of the worst natural disasters in their history. for many years now, japan has been a stall wart partner in afghanistan, an important contributor to the mission there. now our thoughts and our prayers are with our long-time allies and with all those in japan effected by the earthquake and tsunami. >> i can say i believe every person on the committee and every american as well. thank you for doing that. >> thank you, mr. chairman. >> as a bottom line up front, it is isaf's assessment that the momentum achieved by the taliban since 2005 has been arrested inch of the country and reversed in a number of important areas. however, while the security progress achieved over the past year is significant, it is also tragedy i will and reversible. moreover, it is clear that much difficult work lies ahead with our afghan partners to solidify and expand our gains in the face of the expected taliban spring offensive. nonetheless, the hard fought achievements in 2010 and early 2011 have enabled the joint afghan nato transition board to recommend
attention from the historic changes in the middle east and north africa to the tragedy unfolding in japan. as i often say, we have to deal with both the urgent and the important at the same time. with president obama departing for resilience in just a few hours, -- for brazilia and just a few hours, this is the time to consider another important part of the world. the president's trip coincides with the anniversary of a major milestone in hemispheric relations. 50 years ago, president kennedy launched the alliance for progress, pledging that the united states would join with latin american leaders to address head-on a development challenge that was, as he put it, staggering in its dimensions. he understood that our failure to tackle poverty and inequality in latin america could tear the social fabric and undercut democracy's prospects throughout the hemisphere. president kennedy announced the alliance here in washington to an audience of latin american ambassadors at the white house. president obama will mark this anniversary in latin america. i think that is fitting. too few americans ha
of that decade. one thinks of japan where there was no return of growth until the beginning of this decade. how could you possibly attribute to the government as you do? >> i'm grateful for the honorable gentleman's point we have argued consistently and so has the international community that we had a financial crisis from 2008 and 2009. and out of that crisis without making references to tsunamis and earthquakes there are many after-shocks and it takes much time to actually get over that. so i certainly agree with that point. but it was not us who said that we were going to raise growth in last year. it was the conservative government. and the honorable member from chichester when he pointed out that under a labour government we had 40% debt in relation to gross domestic product. my recollection in some years it was 37%. it was the financial crisis that pushed it up to where it was. >> i'm very grateful from my honorable friend giving way. would he also say that's particularly startling after all the motions we've heard from the chancellor and the budget, the growth forecast is actually after
is the highest with about 38%. i think only japan is higher. it is all put this on an impact. will you comment on that? >> you are correct. our tax rate look soon to be the highest. ia good tax code would have a broad base. this speciallot deductions and extensions. by getting a broad base coming you can lower the rate. that provides greater incentives for firms to locate. do you tax based only on profits earned in the united states are blow for profit? but at what rate to you think we should aim for that would put this in the best position in terms of competition on the global stage? >> i did not have a single number in mind. there are is the number of deductio. we will certainly get it down if we can. >> part of the charges to keep prices stable. on the one hand, we have to pay down the debt. to what is this a faulted the economy? it is still volatil or week. athere is a $1 billion cut we passed around. why is the discrepancy in the figure of around 6005000 to 700? that is a huge difference. who doou believe here? we have a number of questions. we are trying to understand the reasons. >> wou
force trust fund and there are other mechanisms, as well. japan, as an example funds the salaries of the national police, a very significant contribution. so continuing that and increasing that is hugely important. the very high levels of afghan national security force funding right now are, of course, necessary because we're building them. and it requires the infrastructure equipment, in some cases various contract trainers and other contract assistance. these are the big cost drivers, actually, not salaries per se. so once the infrastructure is built and then it is in the sustainment mode rather than the construction mode, costs will come down. obviously as equipment has procured. the element of that cost will come down. as afghan trainers take over for contract trains, that cost will come down. it will still be considerable. and secretary gates talked about that. and certainly over time, afghanistan itself as it is able, again, to exploit its extraordinary mineral blessings, the trillions with an "s" on the end of it of dollars. as they are able to extract and get those to mark
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16